Node JS Visual Studio Code: The Perfect Pair

Getting Started With Node JS Visual Studio Code!

Final: Node JS Visual Studio Code

Node.JS is a runtime environment for executing JavaScript code outside of a web browser.

Visual Studio Code is a code editor developed by Microsoft with a focus on productivity and extensibility.

Together, they provide a powerful platform for developing robust and efficient Node.JS applications to be deployed to a server with the right web hosting.

In this article, we will provide an overview of how to set up a development environment, create a project, and debug applications using Visual Studio Code and Node.JS. We will also explore how to use Git for version control and deploy applications, ensuring high-quality and reliable application development.

 

Key Highlights

  • Node.JS is a powerful, open-source JavaScript runtime environment that allows developers to build scalable, high-performance network applications
  • Visual Studio Code is a free, open-source code editor that supports a wide range of programming languages and frameworks, including Node.JS
  • Visual Studio Code provides a wide range of features and extensions that support Node.JS development
  • Popular Node.JS extensions for Visual Studio Code include the Node.JS Extension Pack, Debugger for Node.JS, ESLint, npm, GitLens, and Prettier
  • Using Node.JS and Visual Studio Code together can help developers streamline their development process and build high-quality, reliable applications quickly and efficiently

 

Advantages of Visual Studio Code for Node.JS Development

Final: Node JS Visual Studio Code

1. Intuitive User Interface

One of the most significant advantages of Visual Studio Code for Node.JS development is its intuitive user interface. The editor has a clean and straightforward design, making it easy to navigate and use for Node.JS development. Its customization options, sidebar, and split views all contribute to a more efficient and streamlined development process.

  • Customization

The user interface is customizable, and developers can personalize it to suit their preferences. Visual Studio Code also has a built-in color theme editor, which allows developers to create their own custom color themes.

  • Sidebar

Additionally, Visual Studio Code has a sidebar that contains various panels that can be used to access different features, such as the file explorer, search, and Git integration. This makes it easy for developers to switch between different parts of their Node.JS project without having to navigate through menus or windows.

  • Split Views

Another useful feature of Visual Studio Code’s interface is its support for split views. Developers can split the editor into multiple views, allowing them to work on different files or parts of their Node.JS application simultaneously. This feature is particularly useful when working with large Node.JS projects that have multiple files and dependencies.

2. Code Editing Features

Visual Studio Code’s code editor provides a range of advanced features that make it easier for developers to write and edit code for Node.JS applications. Some of these features include:

  • Syntax Highlighting

The code editor provides syntax highlighting for various programming languages, including JavaScript, which is the language used for Node.JS development. Syntax highlighting makes it easier to read and understand the code by highlighting different parts of the code in different colors.

  • Code Completion

Visual Studio Code provides intelligent code completion, which suggests code snippets and completes code as developers type. This feature is particularly useful for Node.JS development, where developers often need to work with large codebases and numerous modules.

  • Debugging

Visual Studio Code has a built-in debugger that allows developers to debug Node.JS applications easily. The debugger can be used to set breakpoints, step through code, and inspect variables, making it easier to identify and fix errors.

  • Linting

Visual Studio Code also provides linting, which is the process of analyzing code for potential errors or issues. Linting helps developers catch mistakes early on, and Visual Studio Code provides linting for Node.JS applications through various extensions.

  • Code Formatting

Visual Studio Code includes built-in support for code formatting, which makes it easier to maintain a consistent code style across a project. Developers can configure their preferred code style, and Visual Studio Code will automatically format code to match that style.

3. Built-In Terminal

Visual Studio Code comes with an integrated terminal that allows developers to run Node.JS commands without leaving the editor. This means that developers can work with their application’s command-line interface (CLI) directly within the editor, making it easier to manage Node.JS applications and execute various commands. The integrated terminal is also useful for running Node.JS build tools and running Node.JS scripts.

4. Extension Ecosystem

Visual Studio Code has a vast library of extensions that can be used to enhance the functionality of the editor. There are many extensions available for Node.JS development, including extensions for debugging, testing, code formatting, and a container ecosystem. These extensions and these extensions can help developers be more productive by automating common tasks and providing additional functionality.

5. Cross-Platform Support

Visual Studio Code is a cross-platform code editor, which means it is available on multiple platforms, including Windows, macOS, and Linux. This cross-platform support is a significant advantage for Node.js development because it allows developers to work on the same project using different operating systems.

  • Node.js is also cross-platform, which means it can run on different operating systems. With Visual Studio Code’s cross-platform support, developers can build, test, and deploy Node.js applications on any platform, making it easier to collaborate with other developers and work on different machines.
  • Visual Studio Code’s cross-platform support provides a consistent user experience across different platforms. The user interface, keyboard shortcuts, and other functionalities are the same on all platforms, making it easier for developers to switch between machines and work efficiently.

6. IntelliSense

Visual Studio Code provides IntelliSense, a feature that assists developers in writing code by providing suggestions for functions, variables, and properties. IntelliSense uses static analysis of the code to provide accurate suggestions and can help developers avoid syntax errors and typos. This feature is especially useful when working with large Node.JS projects that have many dependencies, as it can help developers keep track of which modules they are using.

7. Debugging

Visual Studio Code has a built-in debugger that allows developers to debug Node.JS applications easily. The debugger can be used to set breakpoints, step through code, and inspect variables, making it easier to identify and fix errors. The debugger also supports remote debugging, which allows developers to debug Node.JS applications running on a different machine or even a different platform.

8. Git integration

Visual Studio Code has seamless Git integration, making it easy to manage version control for Node.JS applications. Developers can use the Git extension to commit changes, view diffs, and manage branches. The Git extension also supports other version control systems, including GitHub and Bitbucket, making it easy to manage Node.JS projects hosted on these platforms.

 

Setting Up Node.JS Development Environment in Visual Studio Code

Final: Node JS Visual Studio Code

1. Installing Node.JS

Below is a step-by-step guide to installing Node.js.

  • First, go to the official Node.js website at https://nodejs.org/en/download/
  • Download the Node.js installer for your operating system.
  • Once the download is complete, run the installer and follow the instructions provided in the installation wizard.
  • During the installation process, you will be asked to choose a location for Node.js to be installed on your computer. The default location is usually fine, but you can choose a different location if you prefer.
  • The installer will also prompt you to choose which components to install. You can choose the default components, which include the Node.js runtime, npm package manager, and the Node.js command-line interface (CLI).
  • After you have selected the components to install and the installation location, the installer will begin installing Node.js on your computer.
  • Once the installation is complete, you can verify that Node.js is installed by opening a terminal or command prompt and typing the command “node -v”. This will display the version of Node.js that is installed on your computer.

That’s it! With Node.js installed, you can start building Node.js applications using Visual Studio Code.

2. Installing Visual Studio Code

Below is a step-by-step guide to installing Visual Studio Code.

  • First, go to the official Visual Studio Code website at https://code.visualstudio.com/download and download the Visual Studio Code installer for your operating system.
  • Once the download is complete, run the installer and follow the instructions provided in the installation wizard.
  • During the installation process, you will be asked to choose a location for Visual Studio Code to be installed on your computer. The default location is usually fine, but you can choose a different location if you prefer.
  • The installer will also prompt you to choose any additional components to install, such as extensions or optional features. You can choose the default components or select the ones you need.
  • After you have selected the components to install and the installation location, the installer will begin installing Visual Studio Code on your computer.
  • Once the installation is complete, you can launch Visual Studio Code from your start menu or applications folder.

3. Installing Node.JS Extensions in Visual Studio Code

Final: Node JS Visual Studio Code

a) Node.JS Extension Pack

This is a bundle of several extensions for Visual Studio Code that are useful for Node.js development. The Node.JS Extension Pack includes several popular extensions, including the “Debugger for Node.js,” “ESLint,” “npm,” and “Prettier” extensions. With this extension pack, you can quickly set up your development environment for Node.js development.

  • To install the Node.JS Extension Pack in Visual Studio Code, first, open the editor and go to the Extensions tab in the left-hand sidebar.
  • Then, search for “Node.JS Extension Pack” in the search bar. Once you find it, click “Install” to start the installation process.
  • During the installation process, Visual Studio Code will download and install all the necessary extensions for the Node.JS Extension Pack.
  • Once the installation is complete, you can start using the included extensions for your Node.JS projects.

b) Debugger for Node.JS

The “Debugger for Node.js” extension allows you to debug both server-side and client-side code, making it a versatile tool for Node.js development. You can use it to debug Node.js applications, Electron applications, and even JavaScript code running in the browser. The extension also supports remote debugging, allowing you to debug code running on a remote server or device.

To install the “Debugger for Node.js” extension in Visual Studio Code,

  • First, open the editor and go to the Extensions tab in the left-hand sidebar. Then, search for “Debugger for Node.js” in the search bar. Once you find it, click “Install” to start the installation process.
  • During installation, Visual Studio Code will download and install the “Debugger for Node.js” extension.
  • Once the installation is complete, you can begin using the debugger to debug your Node.js code.

c) ESLint

ESLint is a popular linting tool that helps you identify and fix issues in your JavaScript code. This extension integrates ESLint directly into Visual Studio Code, allowing you to run it automatically as you write code. It provides real-time feedback on coding errors and best practices, making it easier to write clean, maintainable code.

  • Open Visual Studio Code and go to the Extensions tab in the left-hand sidebar (or press Ctrl+Shift+X).
  • In the search bar at the top, type “ESLint” and hit Enter.
  • Look for the “ESLint” extension by Dirk Baeumer and click the “Install” button.
  • Wait for the installation process to complete.
  • Once the installation is complete, you may need to restart Visual Studio Code for the extension to take effect.
  • To enable ESLint, open a JavaScript file and click on the “ESLint” icon in the bottom bar of the editor window.

If there are any issues with your code, ESLint will highlight them in the editor and display a warning or error message in the “Problems” panel on the left-hand side of the screen.

d) npm

This extension provides integration with the Node Package Manager (npm) within Visual Studio Code. It allows you to easily manage your Node.js dependencies and install new packages directly from the editor. You can view a list of installed packages, search for new packages, and view package details, all without leaving Visual Studio Code.

Here’s how to install it:

  • Open Visual Studio Code and go to the Extensions tab in the left-hand sidebar.
  • Search for “npm” in the search bar.
  • Click on the “Install” button next to the “npm” extension in the search results.
  • Wait for the installation process to complete.

Once the installation is complete, you can access npm commands by opening the built-in terminal in Visual Studio Code and typing “npm” followed by the desired command. You can also use the npm extension to install, uninstall, and update packages and dependencies in your project.

e) GitLens

GitLens is a powerful Git extension for Visual Studio Code that provides enhanced Git capabilities directly within the editor. It allows you to view Git blame annotations, commit details, and file history, making it easier to understand and navigate your Git repository.

To install GitLens, you can follow these steps:

  • Open Visual Studio Code and go to the Extensions tab in the left-hand sidebar.
  • Search for “GitLens” and click “Install”.
  • Wait for the installation process to complete.

After installing GitLens, you can access its features by clicking on the GitLens icon in the left-hand sidebar of the editor. GitLens also provides useful information such as the last commit author, message, and date for each line of code.

6. Prettier

Imagine a code formatting tool that automatically formats your code to make it consistent and easier to read. Well, that’s what the Prettier extension does. It allows you to format your code with a single keystroke. It supports a wide range of languages, including JavaScript, TypeScript, CSS, and more.

To install the Prettier extension for Visual Studio Code, follow these steps:

  • Open Visual Studio Code and go to the Extensions tab in the left-hand sidebar.
  • Search for “Prettier” and click “Install”.
  • Wait for the installation process to complete.

Once the Prettier extension is installed, it will automatically format your code whenever you save a file.

  • You can also manually format your code by selecting the “Format Document” option from the editor’s context menu or using the keyboard shortcut “Shift+Alt+F” (on Windows and Linux) or “Shift+Option+F” (on macOS).
  • Prettier also provides various configuration options that allow you to customize its behavior, such as setting the maximum line length or choosing which files to format.

 

Creating A Node.JS Project in Visual Studio Code

Final: Node JS Visual Studio Code

1. Creating a New Project

  • Open Visual Studio Code and click on the “Explorer” tab on the left-hand sidebar.
  • Click the “New Folder” button to create a new folder for your project.
  • Name the folder according to your project name and press enter.
  • Open the newly created folder by clicking on it, and click the “New File” button to create a new file.
  • Name the new file “app.js”, which will serve as the entry point for your Node.JS application.

You can now start writing your Node.JS code in the app.js file. Once you have written your code, you can save the file by pressing “Ctrl + S” or by clicking on “File” in the top menu and selecting “Save”.

You can also create additional files and folders for your project by right-clicking on the project folder in the Explorer tab and selecting “New File” or “New Folder”. This will allow you to organize your code and resources as needed for your project.

2. Understanding the Project Structure

  • After creating the app.js file, you’ll want to initialize a “package.json” file using the “npm init” command in the integrated terminal. This file will contain information about your project, such as its name, version, description, author, and dependencies.
  • Next, you’ll want to install any necessary Node.js packages using the “npm install” command in the integrated terminal. For example, if you need to use the Express.js framework, you would run npm install express to install it and its dependencies.
  • Once you’ve installed the necessary packages, you can add any other files or folders you may need for your project’s functionality. For example, you might create a “public” or “views” folder to store front-end files like HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, or a “roots” folder to organize your back-end code into separate files.
  • It’s important to familiarize yourself with the file structure and how it relates to your application’s functionality. For example, in a typical Express.js application, the app.js file is the entry point, and it imports and uses other files like routes.js and middleware.js to handle routing and middleware logic.

3. Writing Your First Node.JS Code in Visual Studio Code

  • Open Visual Studio Code and create a new file called “app.JS”.
  • In “app.JS”, add the following code:

Final: Node JS Visual Studio Code

  • Save the file.
  • Open the integrated terminal in Visual Studio Code by clicking on “Terminal” in the top menu and selecting “New Terminal”.
  • Navigate to the directory where “app.JS” is located using the “cd” command.
  • Run the Node.JS application by entering the command “node app.JS” in the terminal.
  • Open a web browser and navigate to “http://localhost:3000” to see the “Hello, World!” message displayed on the page.

Debugging Node.JS Applications in Visual Studio Code

Final: Node JS Visual Studio Code

Visual Studio Code provides several debugging tools and features that are particularly useful for Node.JS applications.

Debugging Basics

Debugging is a process that allows developers to find and fix errors or bugs in their code. It’s an essential part of software development as it helps identify and resolve issues in the code, leading to a more stable and functional application.

  • Breakpoints

This is a debugging tool that allows you to pause the execution of your code at a specific point, so you can inspect the state of your program and identify issues. You can set them in Visual Studio Code by clicking on the line number where you want to pause execution.

  • Watch Expressions

Developers can use watch expressions to monitor the value of specific variables as the code runs. This can help identify problems with the values of variables or how they change throughout the execution of the code.

  • Console Logging

Developers can use console.log statements to print out specific values or messages to the console. This can help identify problems with specific variables or functions and track the flow of the code.

  • Debug Console

The debug console is a powerful tool in Visual Studio Code that allows developers to interact with the application in real-time as it’s running. Developers can execute code snippets or commands and monitor variables and their values.

  • Step-by-step Execution

This feature allows developers to execute code line by line, stepping through the code and inspecting variables and their values at each step. This can be useful for identifying issues with the flow of the code and how variables change as the code runs.

Debugging With Breakpoints

Here are step-by-step instructions for setting breakpoints in your code and using the debugger in Visual Studio Code:

  • Open your Node.JS project in Visual Studio Code and open the file that you want to debug.
  • Click on the line number where you want to set a breakpoint. A red circle will appear on the line to indicate that a breakpoint has been set.
  • Start your application in debug mode by clicking the “Run” button on the left-hand sidebar and selecting “Start Debugging” from the dropdown menu. This will launch your application in debug mode and pause execution at the first breakpoint.
  • Use the controls on the top of the screen to navigate through your code. The “Continue” button will resume execution until the next breakpoint is hit. The “Step Over” button will execute the current line and move to the next line, while the “Step Into” button will move into any function calls on the current line. The “Step Out” button will move out of the current function and back to the previous line.
  • Use the “Watch” and “Variables” panels on the left-hand sidebar to inspect the values of variables and expressions in your code. You can add new expressions to watch by clicking the “+” button in the “Watch” panel and entering the expression you want to monitor.
  • Use console logging to output information about your application’s state. You can use the “Debug Console” panel on the bottom of the screen to interact with your application’s console output while it’s running in debug mode.
  • Use the “Debug Configuration” dropdown on the top of the screen to customize your debug settings. You can set environment variables, specify command-line arguments, and configure other options to help you debug your application.

By using breakpoints, you can quickly identify issues in your code and get a better understanding of how your application is working.

Debugging With Watch Expressions

Watch expressions in debugging allow you to monitor the value of a specific variable, expression, or function during runtime. You can use this to check the state of a particular value or to identify errors in your code. Here are the steps to create and use watch expressions in Visual Studio Code:

  • Open your Node.js project in Visual Studio Code.
  • Set breakpoints in your code where you want to monitor the value of a variable or expression during runtime.
  • Start your application in debug mode by pressing the F5 key or by clicking on the “Run and Debug” icon in the left-hand sidebar and selecting “Node.js”.
  • When the debugger hits a breakpoint, you can view the current value of a variable or expression by creating a watch expression.
  • To create a watch expression, open the “Debug Console” by clicking on the “Debug Console” tab at the bottom of the screen.
  • In the “Debug Console”, type the name of the variable or expression you want to monitor and press Enter. The value of the variable or expression will be displayed in the console.
  • To add the watch expression to the “Watch” pane, click on the “+” icon in the “Watch” pane on the left-hand sidebar.
  • In the dialog box that appears, type the name of the variable or expression you want to monitor and click “OK”.
  • The value of the watch expression will now be displayed in the “Watch” pane as you step through your code using the debugger.

Debugging With Console Logging

To use console logging in Visual Studio Code, developers can add console.log statements to their code, which will output the specified information to the console when the application is run in debug mode. For example, a developer might add a console.log statement to output the value of a variable at a particular point in the code:

Final: Node JS Visual Studio Code

To use the debugger to step through code that uses console.log statements:

  • Set a breakpoint in the relevant part of your code by clicking in the left-hand margin of the editor window.
  • Open the Debug panel in Visual Studio Code by clicking on the bug icon in the left-hand sidebar.
  • Click on the “Start Debugging” button (or press F5 on your keyboard) to start the application in debug mode.
  • When the application reaches the breakpoint, you can use the “Step Over” and “Step Into” buttons in the Debug panel to step through the code one line at a time.

Any console.log statements that were executed will be displayed in the Debug Console panel, which can be opened by clicking on the Console tab in the Debug panel.

 

Using Git for Version Control In Visual Studio Code

Final: Node JS Visual Studio Code

Visual Studio Code includes built-in support for Git, allowing developers to manage their code repositories directly from the editor. This Git guide will provide an introduction to using Git in Visual Studio Code, including basic concepts such as creating and cloning repositories, committing changes, and resolving merge conflicts.

1. Installing Git In Visual Studio Code

Git is a distributed version control system that allows developers to track changes in their code and collaborate with others. It is designed to be fast, efficient, and scalable, making it a popular choice for software development projects of all sizes.

Git is important for version control in software development because it allows developers to keep track of changes to their code over time, revert to previous versions if necessary, and collaborate with other developers on the same codebase. With Git, developers can work on different branches of the codebase simultaneously, merge changes, and resolve conflicts.

  • Download Git

Go to the official Git website (https://git-scm.com/downloads) and download the version of Git that is appropriate for your operating system.

  • Install Git

Run the installer and follow the prompts to install Git on your system.

  • Install Visual Studio Code

If you haven’t already done so, download and install Visual Studio Code from the official website (https://code.visualstudio.com/download).

  • Open Visual Studio Code

Once you have installed Visual Studio Code, open it on your computer.

  • Open the Command Palette

Press Ctrl+Shift+P (Windows, Linux) or Cmd+Shift+P (Mac) to open the Command Palette.

  • Type “Git: Clone”

In the Command Palette, type “Git: Clone” and select the option that appears.

  • Enter Repository URL

In the prompt that appears, enter the URL of the Git repository you want to clone and press Enter.

  • Choose Local Destination

Choose the local folder where you want to clone the repository and click on “Open”.

  • Clone the Repository

Visual Studio Code will now clone the Git repository into the selected folder.

2. Creating a Git Repository

A Git repository is a storage location for a software project that utilizes Git version control. It allows developers to track changes to their code over time, collaborate with others, and revert to previous versions of their code if needed. Creating a Git repository is an important step in setting up version control for a software project.

Here are the step-by-step instructions for creating a Git repository in Visual Studio Code:

  • Open Visual Studio Code and navigate to the project directory you want to create a Git repository.
  • Click on the “Source Control” icon on the left-hand sidebar. It looks like a branch with a circle around it.
  • Click on the “Initialize Repository” button at the top of the “Source Control” panel. This will create a new Git repository in your project directory.
  • Alternatively, if you want to clone an existing Git repository, click on the “Clone Repository” button and enter the URL of the repository you want to clone. Visual Studio Code will prompt you to select a directory to clone the repository into.

Once your Git repository is created, you can start tracking changes to your code and collaborating with others using Git commands or Visual Studio Code’s integrated Git features.

3. Committing Changes

A commit in Git is a snapshot of the changes made to the code at a specific point in time. It’s important for version control because it allows developers to keep track of changes made to the codebase and revert to a previous version if necessary.

To commit changes to a Git repository in Visual Studio Code, follow these steps:

  • Open the Git panel by clicking on the Git icon in the left-hand sidebar.
  • Review the changes you’ve made in the “Changes” section of the Git panel.
  • Select the files you want to commit by clicking on them in the “Changes” section.
  • Enter a commit message in the “Message” field at the top of the Git panel. The commit message should be a brief summary of the changes you’ve made.
  • Click the checkmark button next to the “Message” field to commit the changes.

After committing changes, they will be saved to the local Git repository. To push the changes to a remote repository, you will need to use the “Push” command.

4. Pushing Changes to a Remote Repository

A remote repository is a Git repository that is hosted on a remote server, such as GitHub or Bitbucket, and can be accessed and edited by multiple users. It allows developers to collaborate on a project and keep their code in sync with each other.

To push changes from a local Git repository to remote repositories in Visual Studio Code, follow these steps:

  • Ensure that your local repository is up to date by pulling any changes from the remote repository. In the Visual Studio Code terminal, navigate to the local repository and run the command:
  • This will pull any changes from the remote repository’s main branch and merge them into your local branch.
  • Stage your changes by selecting the files you want to commit and clicking the “+” icon in the Source Control panel.
  • Write a commit message that describes the changes you made. Click the checkmark icon to commit the changes.
  • Push the changes to the remote repository by clicking the ellipsis icon in the Source Control panel and selecting “Push”.
  • Visual Studio Code will prompt you to select the branch you want to push to, as well as any authentication information that may be necessary.
  • Once you’ve selected the branch and provided any necessary authentication information, click “OK” to push your changes to the remote repository.

That’s it! Your changes should now be available in the remote repository and can be accessed by other collaborators.

5. Pulling Changes From a Remote Repository

Pulling changes from a remote repository is the process of updating your local repository with the latest changes made by collaborators on the remote repository. This is important for keeping your local repository up to date and avoiding conflicts with other contributors’ changes.

To pull changes from a remote repository in Visual Studio Code, follow these steps:

  • Open your project in Visual Studio Code.
  • Open the Source Control panel by clicking the icon on the left-hand side of the window.
  • Click the three dots (“…”) in the top right corner of the panel and select “Pull”.
  • Select the remote branch you want to pull changes from in the drop-down menu or leave it as the default option if you only have one remote branch.
  • Click “OK” to begin the pull process.
  • Visual Studio Code will show a progress bar indicating the status of the pull operation. Once it’s complete, any new changes from the remote repository will be merged into your local repository.

If there are any conflicts between your local changes and the changes from the remote repository, Visual Studio Code will prompt you to resolve them before the pull operation can be completed.

Deploying Node.JS Applications from Visual Studio Code

Visual Studio Code can be used to automate the process of deployment, making it quicker and easier for developers to get their applications up and running. By deploying Node.js applications, developers can make their code accessible to a wider audience and ensure that it runs smoothly in a production environment.

Understanding the Deployment Process

Deployment is the process of making a software application available to users, typically over the internet or a network.

In the context of Node.JS applications, deployment involves preparing the application for production use, configuring the necessary infrastructure (such as servers and databases), and making the application accessible to users.

By deploying your application, you can get valuable feedback from users, identify and fix bugs, and iterate on the application to improve its functionality and user experience.

  • Pre-Deployment

Before deploying your Node.JS application, you need to ensure that all the necessary dependencies are installed, the application is properly configured, and any required environment variables are set.

  • Packaging

Once your application is ready, you need to package it into a format that can be deployed. This may involve creating a production build of your application or bundling it with a package manager like npm or yarn.

  • Choosing a Deployment Option

There are many different deployment options available for Node.JS applications, including deploying to cloud service providers like AWS, Azure, or Heroku, deploying to a virtual private server, or deploying to a container platform like Docker.

  • Deployment Configuration

Once you’ve chosen a deployment option, you need to configure the deployment process. This may involve creating deployment scripts, specifying environment variables, or configuring load balancing and scaling options.

  • Deployment

With your application packaged and your deployment configuration in place, you’re ready to deploy your application. This typically involves running a command or using a GUI to initiate the deployment process.

  • Post-Deployment

After your application has been deployed, you should test it to ensure that everything is working as expected. You may also need to configure monitoring and logging tools to keep track of your application’s performance and troubleshoot any issues that arise.

 

Final Verdict: Node.JS and Visual Studio Code Development

Using Node.JS and Visual Studio Code together can be a powerful combination for developers. Some key advantages include:

  • Powerful Debugging Features: Visual Studio Code offers robust debugging tools that can help you quickly identify and fix errors in your Node.JS code.
  • Support for Git and Other Version Control Systems: Visual Studio Code integrates seamlessly with Git and other version control systems, making it easy to manage and track changes to your code.
  • Wide Range of Extensions and Plugins: Visual Studio Code has a large and active community of developers who create extensions and plugins to add additional functionality and support for different languages and frameworks.
  • Node.js-specific Extensions and Features: There are a number of extensions specifically designed for Node.JS development, including support for package management, linting, testing, and more.

 

Conclusion

Node.JS and Visual Studio Code are a match made in heaven. They offer a powerful development environment for building scalable and efficient web applications. Every developer reading this should explore the full range of features and capabilities offered by this combination.

After you have created your application, you will need a good platform to host it. We have included some information on that below.

 

Next Steps: What now?

 

Further reading – Useful Resources

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Visual Studio Code?

Visual Studio Code is a free, open-source, lightweight code editor that supports a wide range of programming languages and frameworks, including Node.JS.

How does Visual Studio Code support Node.JS development?

Visual Studio Code provides a wide range of features and extensions that support Node.JS development, including powerful debugging tools, seamless integration with Git and other version control systems, and support for a wide range of extensions and plugins.

What are some popular Node.JS extensions for Visual Studio Code?

Some popular Node.JS extensions for Visual Studio Code include the Node.JS Extension Pack, Debugger for Node.JS, ESLint, npm, GitLens, and Prettier.

Can I deploy my Node.JS applications from Visual Studio Code?

Yes, you can deploy your Node.JS applications from Visual Studio Code using a variety of tools and extensions, including the Azure App Service Extension and the Heroku Extension for Visual Studio Code.s.

HostAdvice Speaks to ScalaHosting: An Interview with Chris Rusev

HostAdvice had the opportunity to speak with Chris Rusev, the CEO and co-founder of , a web hosting company that offers shared, cloud VPS, and res...
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Eddie Segal
Eddie Segal
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Email Deliverability: What Is It, Key Factors & Best Practices

What is Email Deliverability? Think of it like mailing a letter and making sure it lands right in the recipient's hands, not lost or thrown...
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Ela Gal-Kfir
Ela Gal-Kfir
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Email Marketing vs. Social Media: Which is More Effective?

What is Email Marketing? Email marketing is a  that involves companies reaching out to potential and existing customers via email ...
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Ela Gal-Kfir
Ela Gal-Kfir
Digital Marketing Specialist

Email Engagement Metrics, Calculation & Best Practices

Email engagement tells us how interested recipients are in the content of emails they receive. It provides insights into what types of em...
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Ela Gal-Kfir
Ela Gal-Kfir
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